Observations of the Sixth Annual DUG Conference

Scott Rotruck, Director of Energy & Transportation Services, recently attended the Developing Unconventional Gas Conference. 

I had the great learning experience of attending The Sixth Annual Developing Unconventional Gas Conference, known as DUG East, earlier this month. The conference is based around the sharing of ideas, performance updates, and networking across the supply chain of the Marcellus and Utica shales.

DUG East brought the best and brightest corporate leadership together to update the 3,200 attendees on the innovation, continuous improvement, and execution of business plans in the 95,000 square mile Marcellus Shale and in its older, deeper and at 170,000 square miles, even geographically larger, Utica Shale.

William Gladstone, four-time Prime Minister of England, once observed all you needed to know about a country was whether people were trying to get into or out of it. Therefore, applying a similar metric to U.S. shale plays provides a powerful affirmation that the best and brightest minds in energy see the long-term opportunities as being very abundant.

The following are several personal takeaways from the conference….click here to read the entire article.

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Marcellus Shale Gas and Pa. Steel – A Match Made in Heaven

One of the most important components needed for safe natural gas drilling is high-quality steel pipe.

With the federal government now investigating illegal “dumping” of key manufactured products by foreign companies, there is hope that Pennsylvania steel can profit from this booming industry.

Click here to read the entire article.

The State of Drilling in the Empire State

Despite being home to the first natural gas well in the United States, the State of New York has prohibited the use of hydraulic fracturing within its borders. Since the election of Governor Andrew Cuomo, the question in the oil and gas industry is whether he will lift the ban. Shortly after his election, Governor Cuomo tasked the Department of Environmental Conservation with drafting rules to allow for hydraulic fracturing. While the DEC issued proposed rules and held public hearings on those proposed rules, the likelihood of hydraulic fracturing coming to New York hit a major stumbling block.

Initially, there were reports indicating that the DEC was close to publishing its final rules allowing hydraulic fracturing. However, the DEC Commission recently announced that the implementation of the proposed rules was going to be delayed pending input from the New York Department of Health. The DEC requested the Health Department’s input in response to concerns that the DEC did not adequately address potential health consequences in its environmental assessment.

Almost a week later, the Cuomo Administration hit the reset button and announced that, instead of waiting for the Health Department’s input, the DEC would scrap the proposed rules and start the process all over again.

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